AND HERE’S MODI

Judy Gold

October 04, 2023 Modi Season 5 Episode 91
Judy Gold
AND HERE’S MODI
AND HERE’S MODI
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Episode 91: Comedian Judy Gold joins the AH"M crew to for an entertaining conversation spanning P-Town, parenting, and Israeli politics.
Follow Judy on instagram @jewdygold.
Visit Judy's website for upcoming shows.
Listen to Judy's podcast, 'Kill Me Now'.

For information about upcoming shows visit www.modilive.com.
Follow Modi on Instagram at @modi_live.

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Speaker 1:

Had a tough day. Welcome to Andy's Modi. All right, let's just start this up. Hi everybody. We are in the studio with Periel, is back Boroch HaShem. We have Judy Gold here today, thank God, and we have a new Jewish New Year. Happy New Year, everybody. I want to thank our sponsors right away. Anh Provisions Best Hot Dogs Ever in Kosher Glatt meets. The website is wwwkosherdogsnet. And people have been.

Speaker 3:

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Speaker 1:

Promo code Modi for 30% of your first order and Seth. Happy New Year. Thank you, guys, for being a part of the podcast, and whites and Luxembourg the law firm you want on your side. If ever has to show them you need a law firm and their website is what is it the face beauty is making?

Speaker 4:

Whites, and Luxembourg is your sponsor. Yeah, and Kosher and friend, I like Kosher me.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

WhitesLuxcom.

Speaker 1:

WhitesLuxcom Not, but what does it matter?

Speaker 2:

They also bought Whites and Luxcom because I kept fucking it up.

Speaker 3:

Which is smart. I love that. They did Well good, and I had. What kind of?

Speaker 4:

lawyers? Well, they all Jews.

Speaker 1:

Basically I had. They're the best.

Speaker 4:

Have you ever used them?

Speaker 3:

Actually, you didn't have a consultation with them this week.

Speaker 1:

We didn't recently have a consultation Really Arthur's, my friend Arthur Luxembourg.

Speaker 4:

Oh, kosher, I love him, I love him.

Speaker 1:

And any reason for him to order lunch. Hey, what are you doing? Boom, come over and then like sandwiches and jelly everywhere.

Speaker 4:

Okay, then why don't we record there? Because, look at this shit, nothing.

Speaker 1:

His daughter. His daughter that was on the podcast. She had Jack Snacks. She makes these beautiful and we had some. I was with Jack Snacks. With Jack Snacks is Snacks for the for Rosh Hashanah, oh really I had second night with Arthur and his family. We have to get you. We'll have to send you a package.

Speaker 2:

You're going to die.

Speaker 1:

You'll die, It'll make up for for.

Speaker 3:

Really.

Speaker 1:

Delicious Jack Snacks, jack Snacks.

Speaker 4:

And she's the cutest.

Speaker 1:

Is there her?

Speaker 4:

kid named Jack.

Speaker 1:

No, her name is.

Speaker 4:

Jack.

Speaker 3:

But okay, let's talk about the guests. You came in guns of blazing.

Speaker 1:

Guns of blazing Stories for us, okay.

Speaker 4:

I'm just, but then I have to tell you what happened last night at the comedy seller. Okay, but so I've been here in New York a week. I was in. I spend my whole summer in P-town. Yep, I do three shows a week, three hour shows. I work on all my material and it's great and the audiences are great and I love it. Okay, and I have a house there, whatever. So, and I hate leaving there, like I'm sure you hate leaving Fire Island, right, yeah no, but okay, I hate it.

Speaker 4:

I mean I. I've had that house since 1994.

Speaker 3:

Wow.

Speaker 4:

I spent the pandemic there Like it's a special place. I love it, I walk out of my house.

Speaker 1:

I see the water. We call it a vinkel. That's your corner of the world.

Speaker 4:

Right, that is it your corner to vinkel. Yeah, I kind of want to start a synagogue in town too, anyway, but that's a hell of a story. So I'm like you know, it takes me days to pack because I'm so I'm like procrastinate and procrastinate, you're the worst. I hate fucking packing, even though I've been doing it for 40 fucking years. Anyway, so I get home, I'm like okay, and I'm really worried about reentry, because Ben and his girlfriend spent the entire summer in my apartment.

Speaker 2:

So her son, her younger son.

Speaker 4:

And of course I walk in no toilet paper Like who the?

Speaker 3:

fuck. Leaves the apartment without knowing the espresso pods.

Speaker 4:

No, Nespresso pod and the TV remote gone and he does it. He's like, oh well, it was clean, I don't care, I can't turn on the fucking TV. There's no toilet paper.

Speaker 3:

So your thing is you can use the house, but just leave it stocked.

Speaker 1:

Airbnb with your kids Right.

Speaker 4:

It's like I give them like, just like. The worst is the toilet paper.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think the toilet paper is pretty bad, right.

Speaker 4:

After a five fucking hour drive and then, I walk in and it's a fucking you know cardboard roll. Sorry, ben, ben ridiculous.

Speaker 3:

Ben, you're on the shit list, so Henry would never, I don't think Henry would do that.

Speaker 1:

The first time I ever felt old not old, but like, like as an older person, I know what story you're going to spend.

Speaker 3:

I know, I was.

Speaker 1:

I hadn't seen Henry in years years and I go to do a show at West Side Comedy Club and this very handsome young man comes over, taps me on the shoulder and he goes hi, I'm Henry Judy Goldson, and like an idiot, it flew out of your mouth. I was there, I just came out of my mouth so fast. I was at your brist. I felt like a 90. I wanted to get out of that club.

Speaker 4:

You were at Ben's brist, not Henry. You were at both, both.

Speaker 1:

When you had to fight with your mother, I was at both of them. Oh right, yeah, you had to fight with your mother. She didn't come.

Speaker 4:

I after I said that.

Speaker 1:

I wanted to. I know after I said that I wanted to walk outside and jump in front of a bus, I can't believe. I said I was at your brist. He loved it.

Speaker 4:

He loved it Because I don't have any money. So all right, so I get here and you know, reentry is really hard. What do?

Speaker 3:

you mean reentry? Was this reentry? Reentry from the like?

Speaker 4:

come back from Like I'm reentering into New York. Yes, yes.

Speaker 1:

Those of you who don't know P town, province town it's like a little world of its own.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, Gay world Artist colony Artist Like beautiful yeah.

Speaker 1:

With one big drag and you just see gays walking back and forth and back and forth. Okay, that's your experience that big sign of Judy's face by the theater. You just guys, and, and what's it just?

Speaker 4:

that, but they have. It's not only guys, but they do have like theme weeks Like they have bear weeks. Bear weeks, the best.

Speaker 2:

I've been there for bear weeks. The week.

Speaker 4:

They're the nice, the bears are the nicest I heard.

Speaker 1:

there's why it's made this week, which sounds horrible.

Speaker 4:

Well, that they go to all the drag, like that's what's horrible about this, like sort of you know, drag being popular, it's now lost.

Speaker 2:

It's sort of you know edgy, yeah, subversive for the audience, Not for the.

Speaker 4:

I think the drag queens are great, Anyway. So I'm like, okay, I'm here. I ordered Chinese food. I'm like, okay, everything's fine. And then I had to go in the subway to do a set and I walk and Henry came with me and I walk in the subway and there's a guy lying at the bottom of the stairs, no shoes on, like this going, and I'm just like I can't, I can't fucking deal with this.

Speaker 3:

You know we call that whenever you encounter something like really harsh in the city, Modi and I just call it ambiance we're like, oh, there's a lot of ambiance in this.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so that was major ambiance. Okay, so that's what I I going to my spot. I'm like, okay, then I go to the set, okay, and I go back to 23rd street to get on the subway. That subway stop is closed now to go downtown. Turn on turning off my phone.

Speaker 1:

Okay, that's why stop is closed.

Speaker 4:

So Henry's like well, why don't we go To the downtown one and go to 14th Street and then take the express and look, I'm 60 years old, I'm done waiting for fucking, so we go downtown. I said fine, uber, right, so I go down there and it's 12 fucking minutes For an Uber for a fucking subway.

Speaker 4:

Oh so I said, no, we're getting a cab, we're an Uber. So we go up. There's no cabs. Finally he sees a cab and we go, and so 40, 45 to like it's. I don't even make money, but I have to do it, but it's just like it's so hard, everything's so hard. It's not like it used to be. You know, adams sucks, he sucks. He's a terrible mayor. This place is out of fucking control.

Speaker 3:

No, I don't know that sometimes we're just getting from point A to point B is so hard and exhausting and taxing and it used to be that it wasn't because we had the subway, we had the bus.

Speaker 4:

You know, I ride my bike a lot of places. I just I can't. It's, it's getting too hard like I walk out of my house a part of our, a part of.

Speaker 1:

We have a driver. We were my. When we finish our taxes at the end of the year, my account says to me Do you want to know what you spent on Uber? I could have bought two more cars. I said no, because we Uber everywhere. Right, it's as though we have a driver and that's a salaried person in our life, and that's how we just, that's how we do. We Uber everywhere.

Speaker 4:

We just I can't, I can't do it, I it's it's awful, it's but it shouldn't be like and let me play something, sometimes even the uber blow like you, unless you pay for the nice, nice ones I have.

Speaker 3:

What's your rating on uber? I'm a high. I have a.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I have like a 5.0 on left and on uber. Like what did I do? Like the back of a no, I think that you know if I'm on the phone talking loud or I do think like we've been kicked out of cabs, elise and I, for kissing like get out of my cat.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we've experienced a lot of that shit yeah in uber, is you can? Yeah, I feel nervous about that stuff sometime.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I know, but you know what happened to me. I was on in an uber. Yeah and it's a woman and she has a picture of her kids and I'm like, oh, you know, good for her and she's playing Jesus religious radio and I post on Twitter before fucking Elon Musk took over. What, what you know, because I really want to know what people's opinions are about Religious, you know. Go getting into a cab or what, and having to listen to religious.

Speaker 4:

You know, and they all start attacking, like I was literally asking, I didn't get. I gave her five stars, right? I respect her.

Speaker 3:

I think it's rude.

Speaker 4:

I think it is rude and inappropriate.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, but I didn't like everyone's accused me Fuck you, judy, you're you know I think it's rude, right? I don't think it's appropriate. You're paying for a service and like, you can play music, yeah, sure, but like, just like when I get into a cabin, sometimes they're listening to like I don't know, I got, I've got.

Speaker 1:

I've gotten into a few times this happened that the guys playing somebody reading the Quran. Yeah, that by the way is very soothing.

Speaker 2:

It sounds like.

Speaker 3:

Like Sephardic people reading their Torah right, I don't think you should be playing Jesus.

Speaker 2:

You can't. You're at work, thank you, you're at work. You don't work. Yeah, you're at work.

Speaker 3:

Well, the thing that blows my mind is when you can tell that the drivers are smoking in the car. Oh yeah, in between people. I'm like this is your like work and I have to come in here and sit and pay to sit in here and it smells like shit and it's a health hazard.

Speaker 2:

See as a former smoker, those were my favorite abs to get in because it meant that I could smoke.

Speaker 1:

Not for nothing. It's a lot of young people are smoking now. Yeah, it's coming back. I'm in shock.

Speaker 4:

Well, it's because of their anxiety, and you know there's so much shit going on. I think they're hopeless. Look at fucking climate change.

Speaker 2:

I smoked.

Speaker 4:

I smoked from. I think I started when I was like 15 or 16 Till about 23 and then what happened? Okay, my ex. I went and met her parents and they both smoked three packs of cigarettes a day and the walls were like yellow. Yeah we're sitting there. Oh god, my stomach looks horrible on this. Okay, and we're sitting there.

Speaker 3:

I can crop it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, you better do something.

Speaker 2:

You look great, shut up, you look amazing you just look so good.

Speaker 1:

You've been posting some old clips. You look like Liza Minnelli, you look like a classic, oh my god, or.

Speaker 4:

Patty Lepone Wait, so I go to visit. I see I meet her parents for the first time they both and we're eating dinner and they're like, and I was like I am. I am never smoking.

Speaker 3:

Really, that's what did it for you. It was cold turkey.

Speaker 4:

I, yeah, I, but I kept the pack. I read this thing keep the pack because part of the addiction is going out and buying it and then packing it, opening it up, and so I kept a pack there. So I didn't, you know, and I never smoked again.

Speaker 1:

My mother quit cold turkey from three packs a day but she kept cigarette packs all over the house for a long time right, yeah, yeah, security blanket my mom, my aunt, who died because of cancer from from smoking. I guess they grew up in a time where you looked at it was okay.

Speaker 4:

People will.

Speaker 1:

I just read the coolest thing that you know.

Speaker 4:

I remember I went to the movie theater people, you could smoke in the movie theater. You smoke on the plane.

Speaker 2:

I remember smoke about that.

Speaker 4:

Oh wait, I don't know I used to go on the road right and I would come home and I would open my suitcase and it was like a waft of smoke Would come out. Am I? All my clothes smelled? People would. It was awful.

Speaker 1:

No, we used to go out at night to, and then you'd have to like set all your clothes on fire because they smelled. But the kids today, kids today, the 20 year olds, whether they know how bad this is, yeah, they know, but they don't care because they think we're leaving they have a picture of the actual cancer right someone dying, and so many this conversation is horrible, okay, okay.

Speaker 2:

I have a wait, I have a real question for you what, why, why you rolling your eyes?

Speaker 4:

Because I have to tell you what happened at the comedy.

Speaker 4:

Oh, that was okay, we sorry, we realize we didn't so um, last night I did come to pop up, which was great, and then I did a set at the Village Underground and I I, in the beginning of my set, right now I'm talking about my trip to Israel. I wanted an LGBTQ plus mission to Israel and it was incredible. So I talk about Israel and I'm very pro Israel, I you know, although I do think the government right now Sucks horribly. I think it's a young country with a shitty government that does Not good things, but I think that about this country, yeah, or a young country with a lot of shitty people in the government.

Speaker 4:

Anyway, I mean, it really mirrors the United States, but I I want to talk about, you know, democracy and the United States. So I, it's. It's sort of this I talk about going to Israel and and sort of educating people, and my joke is that you can do things in Israel now that you can no longer do here. So when I got there, I said to Alisa, my lover, you know we're here, I think I'll get an abortion right and it gets a huge laugh and then I say it was a food bait, whatever. So this woman screams out apartheid.

Speaker 1:

Oh, wow.

Speaker 4:

And I'm like, and I'm still talking, and she's like Israel's an apartheid state, and I'm like, wow how did you handle that? You know, then they come over and talk to her, right, I said really it's a comedy club. Israel's not an apartheid state, it's not. Did you say that? Yeah?

Speaker 1:

So whenever we post anything that has anything, well, anything I say that sounds a little Jewish to the right, right, free Palestine. Right, free Palestine.

Speaker 4:

I mean, I met with Palestinians. We met with Palestinians there. Did you know that? The LGBTQ centers we went to a bunch and shelter and we marched in the Jerusalem Pride Parade. If a Palestinian escapes a gay or trans and they go to Israel to find you know, Refuge Right, they take them in, they counsel them, they provide them with medical care and shelter. There was even a Palestinian social worker at the LGBTQ center in Haifa who was there just to deal with Palestinians. And yes, there's so many shitty things going on there.

Speaker 1:

But there's a lot of Meshach energy there too. There's a lot of great things to yes.

Speaker 4:

You know and I just want to say, like you know, anti-zionists, like Israel has a right to exist, right, and that's what I believe. Zionists like I think they have a right to exist and I think they have a right to defend themselves. Do I agree? Like I do think the Palestinians should have their own, I think I believe in a two state solution and I don't believe in, you know, human rights abuses, which you know. Look at this country.

Speaker 3:

Yes, look at this.

Speaker 4:

I mean, look, we put kids in cages. You know, it's just that everything the Jews do is put under a different lens. And I'm just talking on stage and this vitriol, and I said at the end you know, I appreciate your passion, you know, but read, read.

Speaker 1:

Right, they are on their, that's it. They're on their, that's their go-to thing. And we had a guest on here that was explaining the difference between being anti-Semitic and anti-Israel, but it's a combined like. They're yelling at the kids on the college campus. What are you doing with Israel? This kid's on a college campus. He comes from New Jersey, he has no idea what's happening or controlling it, but she's blaming him for everything happening in Israel.

Speaker 4:

Right. I mean, do you criticize? You know? You know, Italy, it's all Catholic. Do you say, Can we?

Speaker 1:

switch the conversation.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, but I just said it was kind of like.

Speaker 1:

Judy Gold. I'm sitting here in front of Judy Gold, who is just an icon period, and I remember my first time meeting Judy Gold. It was in a gay bar called Uncle Charlie's.

Speaker 4:

Oh, my God.

Speaker 1:

I was doing comedy, maybe three weeks, and someone said there's a club and there's a this and I said okay, and I wasn't like out on stage you weren't out. But by the way, last night I was on Godfrey's podcast. He said you always came around with guys, you always came around with girls too, but I was never in the closet with the comedians and on stage I just wasn't gay. But anyway, it was Uncle Charlie. Wait, you're gay, like nervous, just nervous. I got it and Judy, so I go into this gay bar called Uncle Charlie's and she's like the main show and we were like whatever, they're gonna slip in. You know, if you and she was so mean, you were like he'll go after me. I was, yeah, yeah, I remember it was. So it was like there was a, there was a whoever's going on and off and you saw like they're gonna put two before you and then- Well, because they always did that to women, Like you know, first of all, we never got to work together women, Because when I started there, would One per show.

Speaker 4:

One per show, if there was one at all. And then Comedy you Grand had Thursday nights was all female comedians and that was the only night we got five dollars. That was the only night we all got to work together. That's one Thursday night and so every time I would walk. It was very hard being a female closer in the, you know, late 80s, 90s because there was so much misogyny and they would do things to try to fuck you up so you didn't do well. A lot of clubs like on the road.

Speaker 1:

Really Like what.

Speaker 4:

Like I remember, I went to Arizona and they put a guitar act.

Speaker 1:

Oh, no Like. Who did like?

Speaker 4:

40 minutes, oh, in front. And I'm like, why, like just to, because you want me to fail?

Speaker 1:

For the audience. Just to you know, a guitar act is, like the most, one of the most miserable things to follow. The audience is mesmerized with the fact that this guy can do these things with his hands.

Speaker 4:

And they're dumbed down and they're dumbed down.

Speaker 1:

He makes these things rhyme he's different than common. And then you come on with material and they're like really.

Speaker 4:

Don't you have a guitar? Can't you rhyme Right Ugh? Yeah, we're not listening. We don't have to listen.

Speaker 1:

Well, yeah, get the guitar guy back. It's the worst.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I experienced a lot of that and I'm sorry I was mean, I didn't mean to be mean.

Speaker 1:

No, it's okay. People would tell me, like they, I was always in a rush.

Speaker 3:

People say you were mean, you were a brusque.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, because you're so like I want to go do my set.

Speaker 4:

And then someone is like, oh sorry, and you're like what? Like no, I came here, you told me one thing and now you're changing it. It's really hard because you know I'm doing this, as I said, 40 years going on, 41 in December, and you know, you, just, you still have anxiety. Never. You want to kill, you want to, but you get to a point where you're like, you know, have some respect for me, you know, and my time and so what are the crowds like at your shows in P-town?

Speaker 1:

Oh, my God, the best.

Speaker 3:

Smart, Smart. They love you. What do you think is the split of like?

Speaker 4:

I get straight people.

Speaker 3:

LGBTQ.

Speaker 4:

Oh, it's a lot of gays, but I get a lot of straight people. You know, look, I came up in the straight clubs and then I came out in 96 when. Henry was born and I came out as a gay parent, which I think.

Speaker 3:

On stage. You just started talking about it.

Speaker 4:

Of course I have this kid and I'm not going to lie Like I knew.

Speaker 1:

It's funny. I came out as a gay married man to a millennial. That was like I didn't just go hi, I'm gay and this is what I the next time I was like hi, I'm married to my husband. He's 22 years younger and I go from there, and it's more focused on that.

Speaker 4:

Right, so when you it used, yeah, I did not lie about my age.

Speaker 1:

It was a joke.

Speaker 4:

Calm left, fuck down Anyway. No, but I came out. I say this in my show that was based on my book that you didn't come to. Who?

Speaker 2:

didn't come to your show, oh, okay.

Speaker 1:

We didn't go to your show.

Speaker 4:

Did you go to? Yes, I can say that.

Speaker 1:

No one invited us. No one invites us oh really no one invites us.

Speaker 4:

So like when you go see a show, dude, you have, like you know, let's see Michael Yuri call you and say can you come to my show?

Speaker 3:

I tell you something that's the only time Modi knows to show up to a show.

Speaker 1:

When Colin says, hey, I'm doing a show. Okay, you think I'm sitting here trying to learn lines and I'm like oh.

Speaker 4:

God, I have to tell Modi I'm doing a new show. Well, you should your publicist and have her.

Speaker 2:

Do you follow me on Instagram?

Speaker 1:

I do. Okay, I don't like.

Speaker 4:

Cariel, it's your fault. Okay, anyway, it's not. No, it's not I actually came. Guilt, that's what you can call the episode.

Speaker 1:

Judy Guilt.

Speaker 4:

No. So anyway, I say this in the show and it's true that you know I came out because of my child, but it was because of him that it made it easier for me to come out on stage, because I'm talking about being a parent. I'm not talking about, and God bless, all the people that came before me who were out, but a lot of them were working in gay clubs because the mainstream clubs didn't, but I didn't have any material. I'm in this relationship Like I wasn't. You also got help.

Speaker 1:

I had no material either for that, and I wasn't comfortable.

Speaker 4:

It was like the fucking 80s. So it definitely changed the whole trajectory of my career, which you also got a lot changed, didn't you?

Speaker 2:

in the hospital A what the law changed about.

Speaker 4:

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, I got not in the hospital, but when Sharon and I broke up, she hadn't adopted Ben and you know my family's like Dad, dad, let her in, no, it's his. And I'm like you know what. Here's the deal. I had those kids with her and I didn't want Henry going back and forth and Ben, just like they're brunt. They should be brothers.

Speaker 1:

Right, yeah.

Speaker 4:

So we went to court and it was a precedent set in case in the state of New York that I allowed my ex, or petition for my ex. First of all, she's not genetically linked to Ben. We didn't live together, we weren't legally married, there was no marriage at that time and it was a precedent set in case that the judge let her adopt.

Speaker 2:

And then I thought it said mother-in-law my building now.

Speaker 1:

Can you could enclose your terrace? I said I I had the department of buildings.

Speaker 4:

Oh, that thing, yes I did petition.

Speaker 1:

You can legally enclose your terrace in Seward Park and-.

Speaker 3:

Thank you, that's great, and that's what great people do for your service to the community. I also Because it was.

Speaker 2:

you told me that it was mother and father, so all the forms.

Speaker 4:

well, first it started in school. My kids went to public school and everything said mother and father. And I remember I contacted Christine Quinn and I just said you know, look, it's not only that, it's not only for same-sex parents. People lost their parents in the World Trade Center, people's parents are incarcerated, people's parents die of cancer. Like it's not right, it should not say mother and father, should say parent, guardian, parent, guardian. And they changed the forms in the public schools. So that was good.

Speaker 4:

But then the one thing I think you're talking about Ben got his tonsils taken out and the whole time we're there. First of all, I wrote an article about it and we were at the doctor making the appointment for the surgery and the nurse is like doing the checkout stuff and she says and he's on Sharon's insurance, and she says who's the real mother in front of Ben. And I said are you asking who the biological mother is? I'll answer that. But don't you ever ask a same-sex parent who the real? And I always had to like you know how? You can just get, you get in a cab and they're like, oh, you're married. And you could just be like, yeah, whatever, but when you're with your child. You can never do that.

Speaker 3:

Right, yeah.

Speaker 4:

So I always was firm and tried to be kind. But you know like that really pissed me off, so I changed the forms and that like with the Sharpie. Then we go into surgery and they come out and say one of you can go in with him and one of you can be there at the end when he wakes up. And Ben's like I don't care, you know whatever. And we see another couple there with their kid and they both go in and I said, excuse me, why? Well, it's a parent, you know.

Speaker 3:

And again we both went in.

Speaker 4:

Okay then. So and the form still said mother and father. You know on the hospital forms Okay, anyway, he gets his tonsils out, we bring him home. He's, you know, he's sleeping. And I go out to get him ice cream and I'm walking to the ice cream place and he calls me up. He's like mommy, they just called. You know, they did the followup call to see how he was. They just called from the hospital and they're like is your mother or father there? And I didn't know what to say and I was like that's it.

Speaker 3:

Oh, wow.

Speaker 4:

And I called up and then I wrote this article and it was in Huffington Post and the president of Columbia Presbyterian called me and apologized and they use that article as a learning device for other hospitals now.

Speaker 2:

Wow, good for you but and they all change them, right? They change them, yeah, parents A and parent B.

Speaker 4:

But then if you're in a private clinicians office and they don't, I feel like I always have to speak up.

Speaker 3:

Well, they say you know, coming out is not something you do once, it's a lifetime, continuum thing that you have to do over and over and over, and I say that for my kids too. All of your interaction.

Speaker 4:

My kids have to come out all the time and they've had like shitty experiences and I'm proud of the way they handle them.

Speaker 3:

Well, because they had you as an example.

Speaker 1:

They really are a great kid.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, they are really. Oh, my God, I love them.

Speaker 1:

I had a few interactions with them. One of them is like in the comedy world. Yeah, he's doing.

Speaker 4:

Well, henry was producing shows, but now he's working with kids with behavioral problems. Oh okay, he's still producing though. Yeah, he's still producing, but he's so good with kids and I want him to go in that direction.

Speaker 3:

but he wants to. So you also work on a lot of like Jewish spaces.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Like Modi does, and so how do you-.

Speaker 4:

Well, modi's taken over that whole situation, correct. I don't even go, I can't even be in the chosen comedy festival.

Speaker 1:

You were and you upset all the Floridians. Oh my God, I work under the premise of no, your audience. Judy Gold gets on stage. I was talking to somebody.

Speaker 3:

I just Set the stage. We're in Florida.

Speaker 1:

We're in Florida 2000 something 300 to 800 people all sitting there, floridian Jews. They've leaned into Florida, they all have-.

Speaker 4:

Well, when I go to Florida, it's not. Those aren't the Jews that come to my show.

Speaker 3:

They're like a little.

Speaker 1:

Mac guy, you can look out and see you can see the audience.

Speaker 4:

No, I honestly and you started doing the gun material. Yeah, I started talking about it and they all have like they're all armed, they're all armed.

Speaker 1:

I had no idea. You're just like anti-armed and I'm like what is she saying?

Speaker 4:

I know, and they all turned on me. I have a whole bit about it, my act now. Did you read that?

Speaker 3:

article that talks about it. Afterwards it's called the New Jew. No, yeah, it's kind of like how this kind of MAGA whatever right-wing Jewish woman I think wrote it and she mentioned she was like and people think that like we're not afraid to defend ourselves, contrary to what I don't know how she phrased it Judy Gold said at the Children's Comedy Festival and then she quoted you and it was like this is like a new generation of Jewish people who are like locked and loaded.

Speaker 1:

Locked and loaded shoes. That's no joke.

Speaker 2:

And locks and voted Locked. And loaded.

Speaker 4:

Oh, that's a shirt, write it down, here's your title, but I, you know it's a joke Like the joke is about being Jewish and having a God and I do this whole thing about, like I can't even imagine, like you know, my parents with the God, it's really me going into you know, Ma, where's the gun? I put it down in the basement. You know where the Passover dishes are. It's like a whole stupid. It's like a way of getting in, like Jews and guns, you know, and they, you know, it's like that whole MAGA crowd cannot joke about anything.

Speaker 3:

Talk about snowflakes.

Speaker 4:

Right and it's like that and that was it. After I did that, they all turned on me, but I, the joke is about Jews, and you know like it's really about. You know my mother.

Speaker 3:

No, but right right, florida is scary when it comes to guns, like it's a kind of it's kind of the wild west, but also Modi you have to admit, they're not in love with female comics that audience they love Jessica in Brooklyn and they love, they do, they do.

Speaker 1:

it's not true. They do like female comics. They like Jessica Zana did well.

Speaker 4:

She's not Jewish.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they like their guns more than they like their women.

Speaker 1:

They like their guns a lot more than like the female comedians Right.

Speaker 4:

And so like that. You know, I wish I had a gun.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I I'm like-, but you do synagogues you do I do synagogues, I go on the Bima.

Speaker 4:

the Torah is behind me.

Speaker 3:

So do people ever say I have been doing Jewish spaces for years.

Speaker 4:

I love the Jews and I love that. They love comedy and they want to. All their fundraisers are around.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we talk about Berlin now. I mean or David for the next, we'll see you for the next, david, but we but you. First of all, the few times I've worked with Judy Gold, she is that comedian when they say hi, so the vice president of the of the organization is a lesbian. Please avoid that. And Judy hits the stage. Where's the vice president? That's it. You eat pussy. She's that comedian. She's that. She's like she. You cannot tell her not to say something, right? You can me. I'm like what's the story which I avoid? I'm like-.

Speaker 4:

But they love it.

Speaker 3:

Have you encountered that word? No, they love it. Like a Jewish organization or a synagogue is like please don't talk about X, y and Z.

Speaker 4:

Yeah well, I do get you know. They'll hire me and then they'll say you know, if you could not curse, I'm like duh the Torah's behind me.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

And you hired me you know, so obviously you know like people think I have to curse in my act.

Speaker 1:

But I also feel like oh, I thought it's they hired you, so they know they're gonna get a Right.

Speaker 4:

But they're like you know, and just a little no politics, and I'm like I get it. I know this audience.

Speaker 3:

That's what was so weird about Jarring about the Florida situation.

Speaker 4:

About the Florida. I'm like God, I know these, I know Florida, but they're different. Florida too, no.

Speaker 2:

but I also think that that's part of your magic, and you once said something to me, though I never forgot that was one of like the best pieces of advice I ever got from a comic, which was do you remember, always tell the truth, yes, and you can't not like that's you they always can tell when you're lying Mm-hmm.

Speaker 4:

And you're not gonna tell the story in the best way if you're making up shit.

Speaker 1:

Right. Jewish audiences also, I always say, need to know where you are in their world, right? So when he I used to be there, they're like the son that's, you know, a little unique in doing comedy instead of going to law school and then I used to be like now there's a, it's like someone's dad who's this and that they need to. You're the lesbian woman that's with the kid and they need to know where you fit in their world.

Speaker 4:

Well, it was. I feel like that's a really good point, because it's like in the beginning it was really hard.

Speaker 3:

They have to know that. You know that. They know that.

Speaker 4:

Well, it was because here I am, I'm out, and you know this is the 90s, yeah, and it was. You know, people were really scared and then their kids came out to them, right, and they were like oh, I have a gay kid. And when I did 25 questions for a Jewish mother, which was an off Broadway show, ran for almost three years here.

Speaker 1:

Again, we weren't invited to that.

Speaker 4:

People would come and bring their parents and then come out to their parents People. I have so many letters I didn't realize I could be Jewish and a practicing Jew and I get that.

Speaker 4:

I got that so much and I am so proud to be, which I love being Jewish. I love it, I love studying it, I love the way we think. I love I really do I and my mother. It's definitely passed down for my mother. My mother was the only girl she voluntarily sat in the boys' Hebrew school class every day after school. She was born in 1922. And you know, she passed on that pride and that love and I think that my audiences could see. You know, okay, she's gay or she's this or she's that, but she, I Am a Jew and I will. And I talk about like. The other thing is, when you have these Liberal Jews on the Upper West Side criticize like I would get criticized you're doing a stereotype. When you do your mother, I'm like I'm doing my mother, that's how she talks and that's what she said, and I'm doing it in the middle of America, like you're sitting in your little, your apartment on the Upper West Side Criticizing me and I'm in the middle of the country talking about my Jewish mother.

Speaker 1:

It's different right, yeah, right. And first of all, being a gay in the 80s and 90s. It's hard to explain to people that are today. First of all, back then, when I was younger, I didn't even know I was gay. I just because I thought gay was a flamboyant right. You know the drag queen or my mother's hairdresser, but a? But now when kids come out and say, you know moody, the comic you watch on he's also gay right, oh yeah, we were watching non-stop is also gay, right?

Speaker 1:

This rabbi is gay, the senator's gay, everyone's gay, so it does. It takes that down.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I have kids in their like 30s now I had. I was in Baltimore recently and this girl said I used to go in the basement and Watch you on Comedy Central and I was like she, you know like it was like she has a family Wow, she's out. And she's Jewish and she's like you. I came out Right before my bat mitzvah because of you and it was like it's like that makes it all worth it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah even though it's sidelined to my career, it totally. I would have never had it any other way. Yeah, I mean Representation is so important yeah in a positive way.

Speaker 1:

right, crazy incidences in fire island with that, with that I don't know if you saw the video that there was we, jay Cohen, who you love, oh my god, I love my little baby was in our house right, I know, I saw that fucking house that.

Speaker 4:

What is that house?

Speaker 3:

Mansion yeah, it was pretty sick.

Speaker 4:

And were you there like all day it was a quarter shares.

Speaker 1:

We got five weeks throughout the summer one week during every major major in July, september and one double month. So he was there and he's cooking, oh yeah the best and, and you know, there's nothing like getting a Jay Cohen, hala and Ah, right, right, you know cuz you've gotten them right. So now there's the week that we were there. Friday night we always made a big yeah, people always see it all man by the way here, I'm here, I'm here.

Speaker 1:

Of course. So Jake says you know what I'm gonna make six, seven halas and invite everyone to make kid ish. You know to make, I made kid ish. He means the right, the Hamo. I saw and everybody got a little jake on Hala. So we, we, we he's very easy to communicate with everybody on fire island. Hey, anybody wants to hear? Kid ish and Hamozi and Hala come. 50 guys came Just for that, you know, but they came from the beach, they came from their friends, right, they came from.

Speaker 3:

So they're all dressed in their tank tops and shorts and Jake's in a crop top and like it's yeah, but it's that in Israel.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but this was like yeah, so people weren't like. Some people were like that's amazing, you brought shop is to find out, right. So what a blasphemy.

Speaker 4:

Do it. We're celebrating God is not like oh my god, they better not say the kid ish.

Speaker 3:

They're basically. The main point was that, like you said, that you can't be Jewish and gay at the same time. That's like an either or situation. It's not. That's right, it's not that's what, where you lose me. I'm just like, how does that make you can do whatever you want?

Speaker 4:

those are people who don't want to think they want to take yeah they don't. If they thought, then they would have Ideas and feelings they don't want to deal with. So what they do is they're like what does the book say? What is the?

Speaker 2:

rap, I say that's what I'm gonna think.

Speaker 4:

There's so many religious people who are like you know. You're like, how do you feel about? Oh Well, let me check with the Pope. No, oh, yeah. How do you feel?

Speaker 3:

afraid of examining their own feeling guys who are on vacation.

Speaker 1:

Bless their hearts and all of a sudden we reminded them hey, it's Shabbat, hey, this is hot. I just say something though.

Speaker 4:

Provincetown. It's men and women, it's the gays and the lezzies and the truth yeah and you're all like don't you get bored with everyone being hot? Yeah, that sounds really boring.

Speaker 1:

The answer is no, don't you miss a woman there.

Speaker 3:

We went to probably love going to Cherry Grove.

Speaker 4:

Mimbo the separation. Oh, I hate it.

Speaker 3:

I'm not by the way. There's Bleed over happening now a lot more. Yeah they're better big a lot more gays are staying in.

Speaker 1:

Cherry Grove From HBO Emily. Yeah, there's a whole.

Speaker 3:

That was a really fun house.

Speaker 1:

It was a whole lesbian house in in in the pines and they were killing it, oh shit all the parties and we love them. And she works with HBO. And Leo said sent us swag, send us a box for the next hat box.

Speaker 2:

Oh my god.

Speaker 3:

I would love that this big.

Speaker 2:

Swag, but there's a lot more cross cross pollination happen.

Speaker 3:

I feel, like the pines. We only did p-town once and I think we need to Do it again, yeah maybe we can say your house. I won't leave it devoid of toilet paper. I promise I'll buy toilet paper and Nespresso oh.

Speaker 2:

I liked what. I don't know if you said it or Jake said it or you said it, but one of you guys said that if you Weren't doing that, that would not have been happening ever it would, so that's what's incredible Is that you're, by doing Shabbat and doing that, you're giving People an opportunity to be Jewish in a way that they wouldn't be doing it otherwise.

Speaker 4:

I have Shabbat, I'm a challah, and then I invite people over who are not Jewish and they're like so grateful 100% and and I just love, I love Shabbat.

Speaker 3:

Yes, when we first Started dating and you were taking me to Shabbat and I had never been to a Shabbat meal and I was like wait, you do this every Friday, right? I was like that's really special, like really magical, and it was.

Speaker 4:

Right, you stop, yeah, stop. And it was great for being a comic and having kids that, even though my schedule was erratic and they didn't know what you know, is she gonna be home. They knew Friday night exactly what we were gonna do, that's really nice.

Speaker 3:

So what are you plugging? What are you working on? Now, is there? Another show coming. Where can people?

Speaker 4:

When is this airing?

Speaker 3:

Whenever next week, whenever you want or the week as soon as I get the files. Yeah, oh, the file. I'll bump it to the front of the line Um, I am.

Speaker 4:

can I look at my my?

Speaker 3:

yeah go for it. Yeah, grab your phone.

Speaker 1:

Well, I'll just say but what's like the main place to find you?

Speaker 4:

Oh, I'm at Judy gold. Well, my website is Judy gold. Comm j u d y g old, but Jew. No, my website is j u d y g old the website, but on social media j e w d y g old a, which I get a lot of shit for and it's like, like, then don't follow me. Do you get a lot? Of them Do you get a annoying message online.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, people come like have what to say.

Speaker 4:

I'm sure they do I get so much anti, so so many anti-semitic yeah?

Speaker 1:

do you really do? We don't get that much. I delete a lot of it, yeah you don't see that?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I get that. Someone wrote there should be another Holocaust just for you, and I was like Jesus. I was like why kill all those other people? Oh, I mean, like what you know, larry.

Speaker 1:

Amarose yeah, what time you turn to roots turn. Yeah, roots turn was. This woman is older woman.

Speaker 4:

Oh, my god what.

Speaker 1:

She's the book a Country club. Oh my god, old Jewish woman. I think she was in the kinder, yeah.

Speaker 4:

She was at the kinder can really put put together.

Speaker 1:

And she was just miserable and whenever she spoke, and and she would say things in one sentence like like how did you hear Samantha Berkowitz died and Harry bought a new fax?

Speaker 4:

her husband was her husband's name. Oh god, I loved him yeah and he was, and he went deaf and we were all like thank God.

Speaker 1:

Anyway, larry Amarose turns to her.

Speaker 4:

Paul Paulster.

Speaker 1:

Oh my god, larry Amarose turns to her one time and goes Six million. How did he miss you?

Speaker 4:

The best you know, what she used to do, because she wanted, she didn't want to pay you a lot of money, right? So? And Angelo Greco does the best impression of her, but she would you know, she'd be like are you available August 3rd, you know? And then she'd tell you the money and you'd be like, oh, the money is so low and cuz she was getting a shitload of money, yeah, paying us. And I was like, hold the money, sir. Well, let me tell you something. I called up and I said I want the book Judy Gold. And they said, and that's what she would say. She would say they have no idea who you said she was pitching us.

Speaker 1:

And then you get to the club, and you get to the club and there are all of us like oh my god, thank you for me.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, right.

Speaker 1:

It's because of me.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Leona's. I mean, whenever you get to one of these events, there's eight people who, because of you.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I specifically asked for you.

Speaker 1:

He's a wonderful.

Speaker 3:

So, to recap, the title episode is locks and loaded.

Speaker 1:

That's loaded in guilt with Judy Gold.

Speaker 4:

Um, okay, so I know that I wait. Is it October? So I'm going to Sweden?

Speaker 2:

Yes, on the 20.

Speaker 4:

Sixth, yeah, till the first I'm going, do you?

Speaker 3:

want me to pull it up.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, he'll pull it up. He'll pull it up.

Speaker 4:

It's much quicker than this and I'm doing a Jewish book fair in Sweden, which in Gutenberg that's so fun, I will tell you something my merch.

Speaker 1:

my favorite part about merch is I get to see where it goes. Sweden buys a lot of merch. No way, who knew I?

Speaker 4:

gotta get merch. There's a lot of Jews.

Speaker 2:

You helped me with merch. I've been telling you that for years. Wait before we go.

Speaker 4:

Can we talk about Periel's voice?

Speaker 2:

Wait before we go?

Speaker 3:

I don't know how to Do you want me to yeah? Upcoming dates, Leslie Jones, moderated by the that's like okay. Arlington Cinema and Draft House September 22nd the book fair. Yes, and how do you say that Gutenberg, gutenberg, gutenberg Host office, cafe and Cabaret.

Speaker 4:

Oh yeah, going back to P-Town for Women's Week. Of course, Women's Week is about Delbert, October 9th 10th 11th, 13th and 14th yes, the Connecticut Tower, hope Gala. Oh yeah, for the Israel Cancer Research Fund October 15th.

Speaker 3:

Sunshine.

Speaker 4:

Cathedral for the Performing Arts. October 21st in Florida. October 21st, fort Lauderdale.

Speaker 1:

Don't make any gun jokes, no, gun jokes, no gun jokes in Florida.

Speaker 3:

And, yeah, more stuff on Judygoldcom. Those are the Judygoldcom. I have another one. Which one do you want me to read? I don't know. There's some in November, just go to her Instagram.

Speaker 2:

Listen, I'm doing this as much for myself as it is a gift for anybody who's listening right now. Will you please tell the anecdote story joke about your mom and the woman who used to help her. Oh my God, please Don't act like it's such a long bed. It's not that long. It's not that long.

Speaker 3:

Is it an annotated version?

Speaker 4:

It's such an old joke, but it's one of my favorite. My mother material's still my favorite.

Speaker 2:

This makes me cry.

Speaker 1:

I had the opportunity to meet Judy's mom on several occasions.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And let me tell you something?

Speaker 4:

My mother ended up at the Hebrew home for the aged in New Jersey and in Bridgewater horrible. And no, what's in Bridgewater? It was near Bridgewater, horrible. So one day I'm there they're having a Hanukkah party, right and I look across the room and I see Bonnie McFarlane, oh wow. And then I look and I see Rich and I'm Rich Foss and I'm like the hell are you doing here?

Speaker 4:

And Rich is like my mother's here. Oh, no, what? My mother's here, but she's in the. My mother was on the. You know that's a good Rich too. She was on the can speak and not dementia or anything floor, just the you know old. And he's like my mother's on the second floor and I'm like, oh, I got to meet her. So we meet her and I said, oh, I'll introduce her to my mother. So my mother and I go over and we're like hello, his mother was the most even. My mother was like you think I'm Fabisina, beyond Fabisina.

Speaker 3:

The Fabisina Olympics at the Hebrew home.

Speaker 4:

Oh my God, she was so miserable Like you could say nothing that would make her happy, but it was. What isn't that funny? That they were in all right, whatever, Okay. So my mother, I can't, it's not an anecdote.

Speaker 2:

It's a bit I'm trying to not give it away before.

Speaker 3:

Maybe you can do it. Modi's doing your podcast in October, so maybe we'll we'll get it there.

Speaker 4:

Mine's a little different.

Speaker 1:

I will tell you one thing I learned from Judy Gold how important facial expressions are. She used to do a bit this is a thousand years ago where she had her tape recorder of her mother on her mother on.

Speaker 4:

The answering machine. So she literally.

Speaker 1:

She like literally took off, like whatever it let's you do this 15 minutes, set at the end, like for five minutes. She didn't have to talk at all. She would just play her mother on the recording, that's true, and like, at the right time she would just go, oh, I know, and people would lose their breath just the way she would turn Like and the mom would say like, okay, I'm dying, I could be dead, I could be call me Thursday. Yeah, no, yeah. She had a whole thing where she thought I was dead.

Speaker 4:

And she's like where are you? I'm a wreck. And then she'd say so long, but and Judy's just doing. And I'm just like yeah, so I knew exactly when to turn my head.

Speaker 1:

And that's when I learned. Yeah, that's when I learned, that's when I learned physical comedy. Pause and go.

Speaker 4:

Pauses are very important, so timing, oh yeah, oh it is, and I are you musical, oh yeah, you're a cantorish.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you called one time, you remember I gave you advice. Yeah, you were playing a female rabbi or something. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And you asked me what? How do I do a song for Well?

Speaker 4:

I was on. What was that thing with Edie Falco? The big C, yes, and she dies at the end and I play the rabbi at her deathbed Right and I had to sing Kaddish and I usually would just say Kaddish, Morners, Kaddish but I told you to do it in the song.

Speaker 1:

Everybody knows Shalom aleikim mazwa itkada ve itkada, and I knew it. So I was like what should I sing? Yeah?

Speaker 4:

That's it. But yeah, music and comedy. I mean pauses, one syllable, a repeated word that you said 15 minutes ago.

Speaker 1:

Everything affects you know, a laugh, the, the, the, my, no worries bit. I just turned to the barista and go and it just gets such a laugh, even though I, even though I thought I should get a laugh just for the me saying it. It's just that. Look, it's so. And then I learned from Judy Gold just a pause, look boom chat, you gotta trust the silence, yep.

Speaker 4:

That's what a lot of people don't, don't do especially comics are like no and it's, and it's such a risk cause you don't like. You don't know if someone's going to yell some shit out, but you have to if you have control over that crowd. That silence, that pause is so powerful.

Speaker 3:

I think that's a little bit of like the younger generation of like TikTok comedians, where I used to like 59 seconds getting it in quick.

Speaker 1:

Well, TikTok comedians aren't stage comedians, but now they're trying to be they have become, because they can fill up a theater and an arena.

Speaker 4:

Right, they fill it up and then you talk to the booker and you will find out that the show was horrible. They don't know what they're doing and they can't fill it up again.

Speaker 3:

They can fill it up once. It's a one time phenomenon.

Speaker 4:

And this you know, the craft of standup takes so much work, 10, 15 years before you really really know what the hell you're doing up there. Like a doctor, you know, like, come on, but this, this dumbing, this, you know what it's all about? Making money, and I'm going to fill the room with a sub par comic because they have a funny viral video. And these people, what do they learn about? Like they're not going to come back to another standup show. It's really bad for the art form, like before social media. And I know I'm old shut the fuck up. But you had to be great. You had one opportunity. You auditioned for everything in front of a live audience. That you know. It didn't matter who you followed. You had no control over that. You had to be prepared.

Speaker 1:

And now, Now they want to see what numbers you have followers. Are you going to fill the room? Are they going to be able to sell their show for them? Right, it's a different world. Right For good and bad, right For good and bad Right. Anyway, I cannot thank you enough for coming down here. Oh my God, not a slap at all. Canals street.

Speaker 4:

Do you live, do you live down here?

Speaker 3:

We live in the Lower East Side, yeah, but we're never coming from home, we're always coming from somewhere else.

Speaker 4:

Wait, are you going to get a tattoo?

Speaker 3:

Of what?

Speaker 4:

Well, you have Hebrew on you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I don't believe tattoos?

Speaker 1:

I don't. You know. There's a few things I don't need tattoos and many, almost every one of our guests comes here with a Jewish, with a Jewish star. I don't feel I need that. I just opened my mouth and people know, you know, I, mike, mike Rubberport came with two.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, two. Here's the thing. Yeah, I didn't wear, and I mean I always wore, like maybe I since the rise of antisemitism, I am wearing this. Okay, I'm sorry, I have one.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I wear it.

Speaker 4:

When we last time I was in Sweden, they told us to put them away. Oh, really. I'm sorry. You know I have to look at people wearing crosses all day. I find the crosses very creepy. Yeah, and this is just I'm sorry. I feel like, since the, it is Good yeah good. I feel like you're sitting next to a Jew on the subway. Well, but whatever.

Speaker 1:

Okay, Again, thank you to our sponsors, A and H provisions. Thank you guys again, and Arthur and and Whites and Luxembourg, Thank you very much for being our sponsors. I am at modilivecom and we have Lots of shows, we lots of shows coming up. We just added Charlotte, North Carolina, Atlanta, Milwaukee, Atlanta, Milwaukee.

Speaker 3:

We are adding a show in all the things you've been asking for, boston, dc, all those things are coming out. Paris added a show to that. I want to go to Paris. We have four shows You're gonna be in. You're gonna be at the, the women's weekend P-town those days.

Speaker 4:

But how do you get these shows overseas?

Speaker 3:

We have a great-. I've been working hard, honey. He works hard. I've been working hard.

Speaker 1:

We did London. He booked, he bought-.

Speaker 4:

Do you get Jews at your shows?

Speaker 3:

All the Jews, all the Jews, all the Jews. We had to add another show in Paris.

Speaker 1:

It's like they're banging we added a show in Berlin, yeah.

Speaker 4:

Oh my God, can't you work for me? Oh yeah, we should talk.

Speaker 1:

We should talk. Wait a minute. What else is this? I only represent Jews. There's only the show. Everything else is sold out, right?

Speaker 3:

Which just go to modi-livecom. There's lots of live Modi-livecom I'm about to release like 12 dates, right.

Speaker 1:

Anyway, there's a lot of new shows coming up. A lot of them are in your area. There's gonna be Atlanta and-.

Speaker 4:

Oh, I'm going to Atlanta.

Speaker 1:

Yes, when, when.

Speaker 4:

November 11th.

Speaker 1:

No, we're December something.

Speaker 4:

Okay. I'm just saying I'm going on the and then I'm getting my knee replaced On the 22nd book festival Marcus.

Speaker 3:

JCC of Atlanta. November 11th that's Judy's event.

Speaker 1:

Okay. So I always say this Be the friend who brings the friends to the comedy show. You see a comedy show. You see Judy, you see me, you see Periel anywhere. Buy six, eight tickets. You will find people to bring and you'll make them happy and change the live and bring Mashiach energy into it. Thank you all very, very much. Thank you so much for coming.

Speaker 4:

Oh, thank you. I love you all, thank you.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, thank you.

Reentering New York
Israel, LGBTQ Rights, and Criticism Discussion
Comedy and Parenting Challenges and Changes
Representation and Identity in Jewish Comedy
Stand-Up Comedy and Timing Techniques
Talking About Comedy Shows and Dates